Fermented Ginger Paste

A powerful spice, ginger is one of the more well-known medicinal foods. The main therapeutic benefits come from gingerol, which is the rhizome’s oily resin. It contains powerful antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, and has been used for centuries to aid in digestion, immunity, nausea relief1, and overall health. It may also benefit those with allergies and skin conditions, such as allergic dermatitis2.

Whole root ginger is very common and easy to find in most grocery stores, but most people prefer the convenience of jarred, minced ginger paste. These commercial ginger preparations often contain undesirable additives, such as sugar and preservatives, and the canning process destroys some of ginger’s beneficial properties. It’s easy to make your own ginger paste at home. It will retain all of its raw benefits, and will save you chopping time – and money.

Fermented Ginger Paste
Prep Time
5 mins
 

Whole root ginger is very common and easy to find in most grocery stores, but most people prefer the convenience of jarred, minced ginger paste. These commercial ginger preparations often contain undesirable additives, such as sugar and preservatives, and the canning process destroys some of ginger's beneficial properties. It's easy to make your own ginger paste at home. It will retain all of its raw benefits, and will save you chopping time - and money.

Course: Condiment
Cuisine: Traditional
Servings: 12 1-tbsp servings
Author: Kelly Brown NTP
Ingredients
  • 1 large knob fresh ginger , peeled and chopped into 1/2" slices, yield about 2 cups
  • 1 tbsp sea salt
Instructions
  1. Add ginger slices to quart-size mason jar. Add salt, then filtered water to completely cover about 1" from top of jar. Stir well and cover with lid (preferably with a fermentation lid, like this one).

  2. Cover the jar securely with a towel and place in a dark, warm spot for 2 weeks. Shake gently daily and release any pressure from the jar, making sure to tighten lid securely afterward.

  3. Drain, reserving the liquid. Place solids in a high-speed blender along with 1/2 cup of the reserved liquid.

  4. Blend until smooth, adding more liquid as needed to help the consistency. If the batch is too liquid, strain for a few hours through a nut milk bag or chemical-free coffee filter.

  5. Store in refrigerator for up to 6 months.

Recipe Notes
  • Prep time does not include fermentation time (up to 2 weeks).
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References

1.
Palatty P, Haniadka R, Valder B, Arora R, Baliga M. Ginger in the prevention of nausea and vomiting: a review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013;53(7):659-669. [PubMed]
2.
Park G, Oh D, Lee M, Lee C, Kim Y. 6-Shogaol, an active compound of ginger, alleviates allergic dermatitis-like skin lesions via cytokine inhibition by activating the Nrf2 pathway. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2016;310:51-59. [PubMed]

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